Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Brooklyn: I used to always view Brooklyn out my window. 

I was adopted. There were fifteen of us and none of us had the same dad. A couple of years in we all got separated from our birth mother. She went to prison. She was an addict. 

I found out I was adopted when I was nineteen and that’s part of the reason I’m out here. It messed me up. I was lied to. I’m not out on the street by force. It’s really because of pain. 

BW: Pain from what?

Brooklyn: Being lied to and not knowing. I mean, I didn’t know who I was. 

I recently had an event… Thursday I OD’ed [on heroin]. It was not good. I’m catching hell from it right now. This is my eighth time. 

BW: You think you’re trying to kill yourself?

Brooklyn: No, I’m just a thrill seeker. I regret ever touching dope. I look back at my pictures when I was younger with my adopted mother. I love you Mom. I’d love to be there [back home] now. I hate this.

Overdose Rates

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), overdose rates have increased roughly five-fold since 1990. In 2014, the most recent year for which data is available, the CDC reports 47,055 drug overdose deaths in the United States.

Providing overdose prevention, recognition, and response education to drug users and their neighbors, friends, families, and the service providers who work with them is a harm reduction intervention that saves lives. Heroin and other opioid overdoses are particularly amenable to intervention as risk factors are well-understood and there is a safe antidote – Naloxone.
- The Harm Reduction Coalition

See individual state laws related to Naloxone.

Kel

Kel

Buddha

Buddha

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